Difference between revisions of "Template:Census"

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*    '''Herod the Great''' (c. 74–1 BC)<Ref>Some put the date at lunar 4BC. The date of Herod's death in 4BC is highly disputed and likely wrong based on a misidentified eclipse. There were other eclipses. It is possible that a transcriber or the author of Luke's gospel made an error identifying which [[census]] for there was more [[census]]. There were also a number of the local census of varying kinds and what Quirinius was doing and when ruling is also disputed because there is some evidence that he was in charge during other periods including some rebellions in Galilee. None of this is substantive to the message. Some people try disputing the existence of Christ with this conflicting information. These dates used is based on Josephus who does not dispute Christians and verifies them with Book 20, Chapter 9, 1 of the Antiquities with the line "the brother of Jesus, who was called Christ, whose name was James".</Ref>, client king of Judea who rebuilt the Second Temple (in Jerusalem) into Herod's Temple. He instituted the [[Baptism]] of the temple that established the [[Corban]] of the [[Pharisees]] that made the word of God to none effect.
 
*    '''Herod the Great''' (c. 74–1 BC)<Ref>Some put the date at lunar 4BC. The date of Herod's death in 4BC is highly disputed and likely wrong based on a misidentified eclipse. There were other eclipses. It is possible that a transcriber or the author of Luke's gospel made an error identifying which [[census]] for there was more [[census]]. There were also a number of the local census of varying kinds and what Quirinius was doing and when ruling is also disputed because there is some evidence that he was in charge during other periods including some rebellions in Galilee. None of this is substantive to the message. Some people try disputing the existence of Christ with this conflicting information. These dates used is based on Josephus who does not dispute Christians and verifies them with Book 20, Chapter 9, 1 of the Antiquities with the line "the brother of Jesus, who was called Christ, whose name was James".</Ref>, client king of Judea who rebuilt the Second Temple (in Jerusalem) into Herod's Temple. He instituted the [[Baptism]] of the temple that established the [[Corban]] of the [[Pharisees]] that made the word of God to none effect.
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[[Herod]] needed the favor and support of Rome and conformed to the Changes that were taking place in Rome to maintain his ruling power.
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* "'''Birth registration in ancient Rome'''. Birth certificates for Roman citizens were introduced during the reign of Augustus (27 BC–14 AD). Until the time of Alexander Severus (222–235 AD), it was required that these documents be written in Latin as a marker of "Romanness" (Romanitas)."<Ref>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birth_registration_in_ancient_Rome </Ref>
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The government of [[Rome]] provided many benefits through the [[Imperial Cult of Rome]] run through the government-sponsored [[Temples]]. These certificates were stored in the Temple of Saturn.
  
 
: “[[Herod]]’s greatest fault was his ungovernable passion both in love and hate. This coupled with his constant fear of losing this throne led to most of his ‘crimes’ especially those committed within his own family.”<Ref name="Steimatzky">Living in the Time of Jesus of Nazareth by Peter Connolly. Published: Steimatzky 1983. </Ref>
 
: “[[Herod]]’s greatest fault was his ungovernable passion both in love and hate. This coupled with his constant fear of losing this throne led to most of his ‘crimes’ especially those committed within his own family.”<Ref name="Steimatzky">Living in the Time of Jesus of Nazareth by Peter Connolly. Published: Steimatzky 1983. </Ref>

Revision as of 12:33, 14 January 2020

Description_Census during Christ's birth (Luke 2)_. Full audio play on YouTube __Time 7:53
  • Herod the Great (c. 74–1 BC)[1], client king of Judea who rebuilt the Second Temple (in Jerusalem) into Herod's Temple. He instituted the Baptism of the temple that established the Corban of the Pharisees that made the word of God to none effect.

Herod needed the favor and support of Rome and conformed to the Changes that were taking place in Rome to maintain his ruling power.

  • "Birth registration in ancient Rome. Birth certificates for Roman citizens were introduced during the reign of Augustus (27 BC–14 AD). Until the time of Alexander Severus (222–235 AD), it was required that these documents be written in Latin as a marker of "Romanness" (Romanitas)."[2]

The government of Rome provided many benefits through the Imperial Cult of Rome run through the government-sponsored Temples. These certificates were stored in the Temple of Saturn.

Herod’s greatest fault was his ungovernable passion both in love and hate. This coupled with his constant fear of losing this throne led to most of his ‘crimes’ especially those committed within his own family.”[3]
  • Herod Archelaus (23 BC–c. AD 18), ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea from 4 BC to 6 AD, when Judaea province was formed under direct Roman rule, at the time of the Census of Quirinius.[4] He was the son of Herod the Great and Malthace the Samaritan, the brother of Herod Antipas, and the half-brother of Herod Philip I. In 4 BC Augustus allotted to him the greater part of the kingdom (Samaria, Judea, and Idumea) with the title of ethnarch (not king).

Archelaus is mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 2:13-23). In it, Joseph, Mary, and Jesus fled to Egypt to avoid the Massacre of the Innocents. When Herod the Great died, Joseph was told by an angel in a dream to return to Israel (presumably to Bethlehem). However, upon hearing that Archelaus had succeeded his father as ruler of Judaea he "was afraid to go thither" (Matthew 2:22), and was again notified in a dream to go to Galilee. This is Matthew's explanation of why Jesus was born in Bethlehem in Judea but grew up in Nazareth.

The beginning and conclusion of Jesus's Parable of the minas in the Gospel of Luke 19:12-27 may refer to Archelaus' journey to Rome. Some interpreters conclude from this that Jesus' parables and preaching made use of events familiar to the people as examples for bringing his spiritual lessons to life. Others read the allusion as arising from later adaptations of Jesus's parables in the oral tradition before the parables were recorded in the gospels.
  1. Some put the date at lunar 4BC. The date of Herod's death in 4BC is highly disputed and likely wrong based on a misidentified eclipse. There were other eclipses. It is possible that a transcriber or the author of Luke's gospel made an error identifying which census for there was more census. There were also a number of the local census of varying kinds and what Quirinius was doing and when ruling is also disputed because there is some evidence that he was in charge during other periods including some rebellions in Galilee. None of this is substantive to the message. Some people try disputing the existence of Christ with this conflicting information. These dates used is based on Josephus who does not dispute Christians and verifies them with Book 20, Chapter 9, 1 of the Antiquities with the line "the brother of Jesus, who was called Christ, whose name was James".
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birth_registration_in_ancient_Rome
  3. Living in the Time of Jesus of Nazareth by Peter Connolly. Published: Steimatzky 1983.
  4. Publius Sulpicius Quirinius (c. 51 BC – AD 21) was a Roman aristocrat mentioned in Res Gestae - The Deeds of Augustus by Augustus placing him as consul as early as 12 B.C.. Caesar's son Gaius Caesar was sent to administer Syria as an Imperial Legate in 1 B.C. and the Roman historian Tacitus Annals mentions in Book 3 Chapter 48 that Quirinius was an advisor to Gaius around 1 A.D Quirinius was later the governor of Syria during another census.