Template:Golden rule

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Golden rule

Do unto others what you would others do unto you because what you do to others shall be done unto you. What goes around comes around.

A definition of the golden rule is: "a basic principle that should be followed to ensure success in general or in a particular activity."

It is a fundamental element and principle manifested in a free Society and community. We see an example of a biblical rule of “do unto others as you would have them do unto you” in Matthew 7:12.

The Golden Rule, or Golden law of reciprocity, is the principle of treating others according to the standards by which you would wish to be treated. It might not always bring about a moral conclusion, but it assumes that you would want others to help you if you were in need. But some assume an indifference to mutual aid, which may not be the case when a need arises.

In practice, it is normally thought to be a maxim of altruism seen in many religions and cultures.

The maxim may appear as either a positive or negative injunction governing conduct:

  • A positive or directive form or view is that one should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself.[1]
  • A negative or prohibitive form is that one should not treat others in ways that one would not like to be treated.[2]
  • An empathic or responsive form is that what you wish upon others, you wish upon yourself.[3]

The Golden Rule is a unilateral moral commitment to the well-being of others, without the expectation of anything in return.

  • "Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love [is] the fulfilling of the law." Romans 13:10[4]


The concept occurs in some form in nearly every religion and ethical tradition.

Understanding what Religion originally meant and the application of pure religion requires the implementation of the Golden rule in our routine practice of a daily ministration addressing the needs of our society, and because it is a maxim, it would also include not neglecting the needs of neighboring societies.

Caring about others always requires sacrificing[5] some of the selfish nature to care for ourselves more than others.

Both Moses and Jesus along with John the Baptist and the Apostles applied the principles of the Golden rule in their own teachings:

Leviticus 19:18 Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.
Matthew 5:43 Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy.
Matthew 19:19 Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
Matthew 22:39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
Mark 12:31 And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.
Romans 13:9 For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
Galatians 5:14 For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
James 2:8 If ye fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself, ye do well:

Moses even instituted the sacrifice of the Red Heifer, which was merely a form of foreign aid. This, like in the days of Abraham, made the Israelites a cherished inhabitant of any border state.

The golden rule is by its nature a subjective concept, since it is based on the feelings of how you would like to be treated. But because it is practiced in the law of nature, which is not subjective by its definition, the practicality and end result of the rule becomes less and less subjective and more and more objective[6].

This brings us to the "royal[7] law". In the Kingdom of God, there is no king of men over men. Every man is king in his own home and every woman queen. Each family holds the potestas and imperium of the State in the ultimate division of power, and any leader chosen is only titular. The power rests with the people to rule themselves. This means that the responsibility of rule rests with the people, which in turn is why "The hand of the diligent shall bear rule: but the slothful shall be under tribute." Proverbs 12:24

The true practice of the Golden Rule facilitates the Royal Law so that men may remain free souls under God, which is the Kingdom of God. The Kingdom of God comes when the will of God is done. Man's view of that divine will is subject, but since the will of God is the Law of Nature, it is the ultimate objective reality by definition. As you judge may be subjective, but the truth that you shall be judged is objective.

So you should do unto others what you would have them do unto you, because in the Law of Nature, what goes around comes around accordingly in the mean ratio[8] of time and space.

The Kingdom of God is ultimately an anarchy with a Republican Form.

"This Bible is for the Government of the People, by the People, and for the People." is attributed to the General Prologue to the John Wycliffe Bible translation of 1384, as quoted in Lincoln at Gettysburg : An Address (1906) by Clark Ezra Carr, p. 75. [1]
  1. The Egyptian Ma'at contains the proverb from around 1850 BC: "Now this is the command: Do to the doer to make him do."
    "If people regarded other people's families in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own family to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself." — Mozi in 400 BC who opposed Confucianism.
    The Hindu Sanskrit epic Mahābhārata Shānti-Parva says " Hence, (keeping these in mind), by self-control and by making dharma (right conduct) your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself."
    "Treat your inferior as you would wish your superior to treat you." The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca
  2. A papyrus from Egypt around 400 BC contains a negative affirmation: "That which you hate to be done to you, do not do to another."
    "Never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself." — Confucius in 500 BC.
    In the Tirukkuṛaḷ 400 AD Tiruvalluvar says: "Why does a man inflict upon other creatures those sufferings, which he has found by experience are sufferings to himself?" (K. 318) "Let not a man consent to do those things to another which, he knows, will cause sorrow."
    Zoroastrianism from 300: "That nature alone is good which refrains from doing to another whatsoever is not good for itself." Dadisten-I-dinik, 94,5,
    and "Whatever is disagreeable to yourself do not do unto others." Shayast-na-Shayast 13:29
  3. Leviticus 19:18 Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I [am] the LORD.
    "Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain, and your neighbor's loss as your own loss." — Laozi 500 BC founder of philosophical Taoism.
  4. Leviticus 19:18 Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.
    Zechariah 8:17 And let none of you imagine evil in your hearts against his neighbour; and love no false oath: for all these are things that I hate, saith the LORD.
    Matthew 5:43 Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy.
    Matthew 19:19 Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
    Matthew 22:39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
  5. Sacrifice
    Altars | Stones | Clay and Stone | Stones upon |
    White stones‎ | Lively Stones of a Living Altar |
    Church legally defined | Breeches | Red Heifer |
    Corban | Tithing In Conscience | Self-Sacrifice |
    Public religion | Stoning | Sophistry |
    Worship | Welfare | Welfare types | Daily ministration
    Christian conflict | Benefactors | Feasts |
    Good Samaritan | Thy first love | Born again | New creature
    Celebrate | Temples |
    Modern Christians | The Blessed Strategy
    Power To Change | Peine forte et dure |
    Tithing | Offering | Korban
    Korab | Minchah
    Necek | Nedabah
    Shelem | Tenuwphah
    Teruwmah
    Charity | Freewill offerings | Corban
    Religion | Pure Religion | Golden rule |
    Altars | Tens | Network | Pentecost
    Perspective | One purse | Temptations |
    Tithe | Tithing | Tithing In Conscience | Tithingman |
    Tribute | Taxation | Treasury | Corban |
    Charitable Practices | Covetous Practices |
    Fervent Charity | Gleaners | FEMA | Lady Godiva |
  6. Objective: not influenced by personal feelings or opinions in considering and representing facts.
  7. 937 ~βασιλικός~ basilikos \@bas-il-ee-kos’\@ from 935 [king] probably from 939 βάσις basis meaning foot and from baino (to walk); adj AV-nobleman 2, royal 2, king’s country + 3588 1; 5
    1) of or belong to a king, kingly, royal, regal
    1a) of a man, the officer or minister of a prince, a courtier
    2) subject to a king
    2a) of a country
    3) befitting or worthy of a king, royal
    4) metaph. principal, chief
  8. The golden ratio is also called the golden mean or golden section (Latin: sectio aurea) extreme and mean ratio. In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. 1.6180339887498948482