Luke 13

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The men who were injured and some killed by Pilate were protesting the use of Corban funds for public works in Jerusalem and at the Tower of Siloam..
The actual carved stone used in the aqueduct that brought water into Jerusalem. The Jewish historian Josephus makes it clear that funds from the temple treasury were called “Corban,” hence could not be used for secular purposes, e.g., city improvements, as in the building of an aqueduct for water supply (Wars 2.9.4).[1]
Pontius Pilate's appropriation of funds from the holy treasury to build an aqueduct[2] stirred up a coordinated protest in Jerusalem and possibly at the tower of Siloam, which was likely used to guard the spring, protecting and controlling water flow into the aqueduct.[3]
Pilate discovered the plot and set soldiers in plain clothes among them in Jerusalem. The protest turned into a riotous rebellion in which men died.[4]
When some militant Zealots simultaneously occupied the tower of Siloam, Pilate would have also sent troops to seize the tower which got eighteen men killed. Some believe Barabbas was arrested because of these seditious events. The cross was reserved for rebels who would seek to overthrow the government. Luke 13 is talking about the protestors' rebellion against the misuse of the Corban funds.
Verse 28 is similar to verse 11 in Matthew 8:11 where the children of what Matthew calls the Kingdom of Heaven are cast out.
Both these verses should be equated with the verse in Matthew 21:43 "Therefore say I unto you, The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof." In both cases cast and thrust are from the same Greek word ekballo.[5]
The fulfillment of this prophecy is seen in numerous verses from the events of casting out the money changers to John 19:15 "But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar."
Everyone has the choice to live by force through the wages of unrighteousness or seek to live by righteousness through faith hope and charity like Abraham. Hebrews 11:8 "By faith Abraham, when he was called to go out into a place which he should after receive for an inheritance, obeyed; and he went out, not knowing whither he went. By faith he sojourned in the land of promise, as in a strange country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs with him of the same promise:"


[1] There were present at that season some that told him of the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. [2] And Jesus answering said unto them, Suppose ye that these Galilaeans were sinners above all the Galilaeans, because they suffered such things? [3] I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish. [4] Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem? [5] I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish. [6] He spake also this parable; A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came and sought fruit thereon, and found none. [7] Then said he unto the dresser of his vineyard, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground? [8] And he answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this year also, till I shall dig about it, and dung it: [9] And if it bear fruit, well: and if not, then after that thou shalt cut it down.

[10] And he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. [11] And, behold, there was a woman which had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and was bowed together, and could in no wise lift up herself. [12] And when Jesus saw her, he called her to him, and said unto her, Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity. [13] And he laid his hands on her: and immediately she was made straight, and glorified God. [14] And the ruler of the synagogue answered with indignation, because that Jesus had healed on the sabbath day, and said unto the people, There are six days in which men ought to work: in them therefore come and be healed, and not on the sabbath day. [15] The Lord then answered him, and said, Thou hypocrite, doth not each one of you on the sabbath loose his ox or his ass from the stall, and lead him away to watering? [16] And ought not this woman, being a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan hath bound, lo, these eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the sabbath day? [17] And when he had said these things, all his adversaries were ashamed: and all the people rejoiced for all the glorious things that were done by him.

[18] Then said he, Unto what is the kingdom of God like? and whereunto shall I resemble it? [19] It is like a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and cast into his garden; and it grew, and waxed a great tree; and the fowls of the air lodged in the branches of it. [20] And again he said, Whereunto shall I liken the kingdom of God? [21] It is like leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened. [22] And he went through the cities and villages, teaching, and journeying toward Jerusalem.

[23] Then said one unto him, Lord, are there few that be saved? And he said unto them, [24] Strive to enter in at the strait gate: for many, I say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be able. [25] When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are: [26] Then shall ye begin to say, We have eaten and drunk in thy presence, and thou hast taught in our streets. [27] But he shall say, I tell you, I know you not whence ye are; depart from me, all ye workers of iniquity. [28] There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrust out. [29] And they shall come from the east, and from the west, and from the north, and from the south, and shall sit down in the kingdom of God. [30] And, behold, there are last which shall be first, and there are first which shall be last.

[31] The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee. [32] And he said unto them, Go ye, and tell that fox, Behold, I cast out devils, and I do cures to day and to morrow, and the third day I shall be perfected. [33] Nevertheless I must walk to day, and to morrow, and the day following: for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem. [34] O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not! [35] Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

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  1. The Greek word korban is related to the term korbanas, signifying the “temple treasury.” Korbanas'(or κορβανᾶς)': among the Jews the holy treasury.
  2. It brought in water from a distance of seventy-two kilometers.
  3. "From the Suda or Souda a tenth-century Byzantine encyclopedia of the ancient Mediterranean, which uses ancient sources that have since been lost.
  4. "At another time he used the sacred treasure of the temple, called corban (qorban), to pay for bringing water into Jerusalem by an aqueduct. A crowd came together and clamored against him; but he had caused soldiers dressed as civilians to mingle with the multitude, and at a given signal they fell upon the rioters and beat them so severely with staves that the riot was quelled." The Aqueduct- Josephus, War 2.175-177, Antiq 18.60-62.
  5. 1544 ~ἐκβάλλω~ ekballo \@ek-bal’-lo\@ from 1537 and 906; TDNT-1:527,91; {See TDNT 122} v AV-cast out 45, cast 11, bring forth 3, pull out 3, send forth 3, misc 17; 82
    1) to cast out, drive out, to send out
    1a) with notion of violence
    1a1) to drive out (cast out)
    1a2) to cast out
    1a2a) of the world, i.e. be deprived of the power and influence he exercises in the world
    1a2b) a thing: excrement from the belly into the sink
    1a3) to expel a person from a society: to banish from a family
    1a4) to compel one to depart; to bid one depart, in stern though not violent language
    1a5) so employed that the rapid motion of the one going is
    transferred to the one sending forth
    1a51) to command or cause one to depart in haste
    1a6) to draw out with force, tear out
    1a7) with implication of force overcoming opposite force
    1a7a) to cause a thing to move straight on its intended goal
    1a8) to reject with contempt, to cast off or away
    1b) without the notion of violence
    1b1) to draw out, extract, one thing inserted in another
    1b2) to bring out of, to draw or bring forth
    1b3) to except, to leave out, i.e. not receive
    1b4) to lead one forth or away somewhere with a force which he cannot resist